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10 things to do in San Antonio with kids this weekend of August 5 2022 – San Antonio Things To Do

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Aug 5, 2022 | , ,
things to do in San Antonio with Kids this weekend of August 5 2022 | Image credit: TJH’s Superhero Car Show & Comic Con
Our top choices for things to do in San Antonio with kids this weekend of August 5 2022 include TJH’s Superhero Car Show & Comic Con, Fit Family Challenge at Brooks City Base, Locals Day at the Briscoe, and more!
Image 1: Pogo Pass to 35 Things to Do in Austin, San Antonio and Waco
The Standard South Central Texas Pogo Pass (San Antonio/Austin/Waco) provides admissions to 35 different entertainment venues in the San Antonio, Austin and Waco area.
Perfect for families, the Pogo Pass gives both adult and child pass-holders 50+ visits to some of the best things to do that San Antonio, Austin and Waco have to offer. The Pogo Pass nearly pays for itself with a visit to one or two venues alone!!!
Pass Features the following Attractions in San Antonio
Check out the POGO pass and SAVE Big on San Antonio Attractions! 
Image credit: The Mad Potter Facebook Page
Let the kids have a night out at Clay Casa! The fun includes pottery, crafting, games, and an exciting theme. The ticket includes a snack and drink for each child.
When: Friday, August 5 | 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Where: 502 Embassy Oaks, San Antonio, TX
How much: $40
 
Los Patios is hosting an outdoor movie night! Bring a lawn chair, and blanket, and enjoy the newest Jumanji film. If you come early, you can check out the bounce house and lawn games.
When: Friday, August 5 | 6:00 p.m.
Where: 2015 NE Loop 410, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Image credit: PMX Events Website
If your child enjoys superheroes and cars, get your tickets to the Comic Con. This show features car creations from hit movies and tv shows. Meet your favorite superheroes and more.
When: Friday, August 5 | 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Where: 3201 E Houston St, San Antonio, TX
How much: $15 and up
Sur La Table Summer Camps in Houston
Kids and Teens Summer Series by Sur La Table calls on all young chefs to get ready for five fun-filled days of cooking, learning, and laughter at the Sur La Table kitchens.
The classes will be small and hands-on allowing for plenty of mixing, prepping and cooking. The instructors are both talented chefs and teachers, and they will make sure that everyone has a great time. Young cooks will explore menus full of exciting discoveries, from how to prepare favorite dishes to new twists on classic desserts.
Students receive a certificate of completion, a free apron (colors may vary) and a coupon good for 10% off an in-store purchase while class is in session! 
Location: Shops at La Cantera- 15900 La Cantera Parkway, #19120, San Antonio
Dates: Various 4 day and 5 day camps between May 31st and August 19
Cost: Varies
Check out our full list of Summer Camps 2022 in San Antonio
The Cherrity Bar and SAAACAM invite families out for a chance to receive school supplies! Backpacks, books, and other necessary school materials will be available so your child can go back to school prepared.
When: Saturday, August 6 | 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Where: 302 Montana St, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Image credit: Fit Family Challenge Facebook Page
Get in one last summer challenge with the whole family! Runners, walkers, and strollers are welcome. Themed t-shirts are first come first serve, and be sure to bring water!
When: Saturday, August 6 | 7:30 a.m.
Where: 8081 Inner Circle Rd, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Did you know McAllister Park has some dirt trails? Take advantage of this free kid-friendly event to get out on the trails with a mountain bike. Kids will learn the basic skills – see site for details.
When: Saturday, August 6 | 9:00 a.m.
Where: 13102 Jones Maltsberger Rd, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Image credit: Alamo City LX Facebook Page
Check out some old and new Mopar cars at this monthly family-friendly event! Whether it be checking out Chargers or Challengers or playing at the base of the Tower, this is a great night out with the family.
When: Saturday, August 6 | 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
Where: 739 E Cesar E Chavez Blvd, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
Drama Kids International Summer Camps are among the best summer camps in the San Antonio area. 
In the Super Heroes Camp at Drama Kids International, kids will perform mighty feats of strength and cunning as they write, solve, and act up in plays – created, directed, and performed entirely by THEM!
Campers will use all their superpowers to create a plot, characters, stage movement, songs, and more as they work together to save the planet (or whatever else they may wish to save). Campers will bring the house down during their end of camp DKI Playhouse Presentation, performing a play created by their team! 

We have rounded up the best summer camps in the San Antonio area. Drama Kids International is one of them. There are camps in areas of Sports, Outdoors, STEM and more! 
Check out our full list of the Best Summer Camps for 2022 in the San Antonio area!
Image credit: Briscoe Western Art Museum Facebook Page
The Wild West is all around in Texas. Learn a bit more about it at the Briscoe Museum, which hosts locals day of free admission for Bexar County residents to enjoy!
When: Sunday, August 7 | 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Where: 210 W Market St, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Image credit: Broosters Backyard Ice House Facebook Page
Celebrate back to school at Brooster’s! This event will feature an in-house band, a live Mickey and Minnie guest appearance, and more!
When: Sunday, August 7 | 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Where: 815 Pleasanton Rd, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
 
Spend some time down by the River Walk and check out local vendor booths at this Artisan Show. Booths will include all sorts of unique gifts or treats that the family can enjoy.
When: Sunday, August 7 | 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Where: 602 E Commerce St, San Antonio, TX
How much: Free
Image 5: Up to 18% Off Admission to SeaWorld San Antonio
What: One Single-Day Ticket to SeaWorld San Antonio: Valid Through 01/03/2023. Attractions include roller coasters, up-close sea life interactions, and world-class shows at one San Antonio’s largest amusement parks.
Where: Sea World San Antonio – 10500 Sea World Dr, San Antonio, TX 78251
How Much: Up to 18% discount on admission at Sea World and Aquatica, San Antonio
Also, check out our 20 Top things to do with toddlers & kids in San Antonio
For the latest events and activities, check out our weekly updates to Things to do in San Antonio this Weekend, and Things to do in San Antonio this Week 
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Mirella is a UTSA and TTU alumna located in San Antonio, TX. Writing has been Mirella’s thing for as long as she can remember. When Mirella isn’t writing she’s probably baking, reading, or working out as she currently competes in NPC bodybuilding competitions.
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2022 Guide for Best Summer Camps in San Antonio: Free & Cheap Camps
Best Summer Camps In San Antonio for 2022: Cheap & Free Camps for Kids in STEM, Sports, Arts & More!
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Texas’ diversity, equity and inclusion ban has led to more than 100 job cuts at state universities

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Texas’ diversity, equity and inclusion ban has led to more than 100 job cuts at state universities

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A ban on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives in higher education has led to more than 100 job cuts across university campuses in Texas, a hit echoed or anticipated in numerous other states where lawmakers are rolling out similar policies during an important election year.

Universities throughout Texas rushed to make changes after Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed the law last year. On April 2, the president of the 52,000-student University of Texas at Austin — one of the largest college campuses in the U.S. — sent an email saying the school was shuttering the Division of Campus and Community Engagement and eliminating jobs in order to comply with the ban, which went into effect on Jan. 1.

More than 60 University of Texas at Austin staff members were terminated as a result of the law, according to the Texas Conference of the American Association of University Professors. The group said it compiled the list based on affected employees who had reached out and that the number could be greater. University officials declined to confirm the number of positions eliminated.

Officials at other schools, in response to inquiries from The Associated Press, indicated that a total of 36 positions were eliminated between Texas A&M University in College Station; Texas Tech University in Lubbock; Texas State University in San Marcos; The University of Houston; Sam Houston State University in Huntsville; and Sul Ross State University in Alpine. Officials said no one was let go; people were assigned to new jobs, some resigned and vacant positions were closed.

Earlier this week, University of Texas at Dallas officials announced that approximately 20 associate jobs would be eliminated in compliance with the law. University officials declined to comment on how many of those positions are currently filled.

Texas House of Representatives Speaker Dade Phelan, a Republican, applauded the University of Texas actions in a post on the social media platform X. “It is a victory for common sense and proof that the Legislature’s actions are working,” Phelan wrote.

Texas is among five states that have recently passed legislation targeting DEI programs. At least 20 others are considering it.

Florida was the first to implement a ban, last year, with the vocal backing of then-Republican presidential candidate Gov. Ron DeSantis, who often derides DEI and similar diversity efforts as “woke” policies of the left. In response to the law, the University of Florida last month announced more than a dozen terminations.

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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, photo, ivy grows near the lettering of an entrance to the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. A ban on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives in higher education has led to more than 100 job cuts across university campuses in Texas, a hit echoed or anticipated in numerous other states where lawmakers are rolling out similar policies during an important election year. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

 

FILE – In this Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, photo, ivy grows near the lettering of an entrance to the University of Texas in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

 

Universities of Wisconsin regents reached a deal with Republican lawmakers in December to limit DEI positions at the system’s two dozen campuses in exchange for getting funds for staff raises and construction projects. The deal imposed a hiring freeze on diversity positions through 2026, and shifted more than 40 diversity-related positions to focus on “student success.”

Republican legislators who oppose DEI programs say they are discriminatory and promote left-wing ideology. Some are counting on the issue to resonate with voters during this election year. Democratic DEI supporters say the programs are necessary to ensure that institutions meet the needs of increasingly diverse student populations. Lawmakers from the party have filed about two dozen bills in 11 states that would require or promote DEI initiatives.

Texas’ anti-DEI law, which Abbott enthusiastically signed last year, prohibits training and activities conducted “in reference to race, color, ethnicity, gender identity, or sexual orientation.” Additionally, the law, also known by its legislative title, SB17, forbids staff members from making hiring decisions that are influenced by race, sex, color or ethnicity, and prohibits promoting “differential” or “preferential” treatment or “special” benefits for people based on these categories.

SB17 states that the ban doesn’t apply to academic course instruction and scholarly research. That’s why professor Aquasia Shaw was so surprised to hear last week that her supervisor was not going to renew her contract. Shaw said she was not given a reason for the termination, but considering the timing, she suspects it’s the new law.

 
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FILE - Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a news conference Friday, March 1, 2024, in Borger, Texas. Texas' ban on diversity, equity and inclusion instruction has resulted in more than 100 jobs being cut at University of Texas campuses across the state — providing a glimpse of the potential impact of such bans being implemented in other Republican-controlled states. Abbott signed a law last year prohibiting DEI initiatives in public higher education. (Elías Valverde II/The Dallas Morning News via AP, File)

 

FILE – Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a news conference Friday, March 1, 2024, in Borger, Texas. (Elías Valverde II/The Dallas Morning News via AP, File)

 

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Shaw taught courses on the intersection of sociology, sports and cultural studies in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Her faculty page on the university’s website states her focus as “sociology of sport and cultural studies, sport management and diversity, inclusion and social justice.” A course she taught this semester was titled Race and Sports in African American Life. But she said she had not been involved in any DEI initiatives outside of her teaching.

“I was under the impression that teaching and research was protected so … I am trying to grapple with the idea and in denial that this can’t be the reason I was targeted,” she said.

In March, Republican state Sen. Brandon Creighton, who authored SB17, sent a letter to public university boards of regents across the state, inviting them to testify in May about the changes that have been made to achieve compliance. He included a warning that renaming programs, rather than changing their intent, would not be sufficient.

Creighton’s office did not respond to an emailed request for comment.

The law’s impact was felt in Texas even before it went into effect. In anticipation, University of Texas at Austin officials last year changed the school’s Division of Diversity and Community Engagement to the Division of Campus and Community Engagement. The name change didn’t save it — it was closed this month. School officials said some of the division’s projects would be relocated, while others would be shut down. They did not provide specifics.

Shaw said she was the only person of color in her department. She said she saw on X that other university employees had been let go and began connecting with them. At least 10 of the other terminated faculty and staff members whom she contacted are also from minority groups, she said.

The loss of her job was a big blow to Shaw, who had already scheduled classes for this summer and fall. She said her superiors had previously told her they hoped to renew her contract.

“I am so disheartened to see that exactly what I was concerned about ended up happening anyway,” Shaw said.

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Dallas doctor convicted of tampering with IV bags linked to coworker’s death and other emergencies

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Dallas doctor convicted of tampering with IV bags linked to coworker’s death and other emergencies

DALLAS (AP) — A Dallas anesthesiologist was convicted Friday for injecting a nerve-blocking agent and other drugs into bags of intravenous fluid at a surgical center where he worked, which led to the death of a coworker and caused cardiac emergencies for several patients, federal prosecutors said.

A jury convicted Raynaldo Riviera Ortiz Jr., 60, of four counts of tampering with consumer products resulting in serious bodily injury, one count of tampering with a consumer product and five counts of intentional adulteration of a drug, prosecutors said. A sentencing date has not yet been set for Ortiz, who faces up to 190 years in prison.

“Dr. Ortiz cloaked himself in the white coat of a healer, but instead of curing pain, he inflicted it,” U.S. Attorney Leigha Simonton for the northern district of Texas said in a video statement.

Prosecutors said that evidence presented at trial showed that numerous patients at Surgicare North Dallas suffered cardiac emergencies during routine medical procedures performed by various doctors between May 2022 and August 2022. During that time, an anesthesiologist who had worked at the facility earlier that day died while treating herself for dehydration using an IV bag.

Prosecutors said Ortiz, who was arrested in September 2022, had surreptitiously placed the tainted IV bags into a warming bin at the facility and waited for them to be used in his colleagues’ surgeries.

Evidence presented at trial showed that at the time of the emergencies, Ortiz was facing disciplinary action for an alleged medical mistake made in one of his own surgeries, prosecutors said.

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Texas woman sues prosecutors who charged her with murder after she self-managed an abortion

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Texas woman sues prosecutors who charged her with murder after she self-managed an abortion

McALLEN, Texas (AP) — A Texas woman who was charged with murder over self-managing an abortion and spent two nights in jail has sued prosecutors along the U.S.-Mexico border who put the criminal case in motion before it was later dropped.

The lawsuit filed by Lizelle Gonzalez in federal court Thursday comes a month after the State Bar of Texas fined and disciplined the district attorney in rural Starr County over the case in 2022, when Gonzalez was charged with murder in “the death of an individual by self-induced abortion.”

Under the abortion restrictions in Texas and other states, women who seek abortion are exempt from criminal charges.

The lawsuit argues Gonzalez suffered harm from the arrest and subsequent media coverage. She is seeking $1 million in damages.

“The fallout from Defendants’ illegal and unconstitutional actions has forever changed the Plaintiff’s life,” the lawsuit stated.

Starr County District Attorney Gocha Ramirez said Friday that he had not yet been served the lawsuit and declined comment. Starr County Judge Eloy Vera, the county’s top elected official, also declined comment.

According to the lawsuit, Gonzalez was 19 weeks pregnant when she used misoprostol, one of two drugs used in medication abortions. Misoprostol is also used to treat stomach ulcers.

After taking the pills, Gonzalez received an obstetrical examination at the hospital emergency room and was discharged with abdominal pain. She returned with bleeding the next day and an exam found no fetal heartbeat. Doctors performed a caesarian section to deliver a stillborn baby.

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The lawsuit argues that the hospital violated the patient’s privacy rights when they reported the abortion to the district attorney’s office, which then carried out its own investigation and produced a murder charge against Gonzalez.

Cecilia Garza, an attorney for Gonzalez, said prosecutors pursued an indictment despite knowing that a woman receiving the abortion is exempted from a murder charge by state law.

Ramirez announced the charges would be dropped just days after the woman’s arrest but not before she’d spent two nights in jail and was identified by name as a murder suspect.

In February, Ramirez agreed to pay a $1,250 fine and have his license held in a probated suspension for 12 months in a settlement reached with the State Bar of Texas. He told The Associated Press at the time that he “made a mistake” and agreed to the punishment because it allows his office to keep running and him to keep prosecuting cases.

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